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MARCH 29, 2020

WE THE PEOPLE RADIO

 

Hour 1 Thriving on Mission with Matt Rogie WE THE PEOPLE RADIO
       
Hour 2 Centre for Metrics Shaun Flanagan WE THE PEOPLE RADIO

Thriving on Mission - Centre for Metrics from Robert Exter on Vimeo.

Hour 1: Thriving on Mission - Matt Rogie

Matt Rogie served for 22 years, half of those in the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR). Matt’s first combat deployment was in January 2002 to Afghanistan and by the time he retired in 2010 he had completed 7 combat deployments to Afghanistan & Iraq. Matt flew countless combat missions supporting US Army Rangers, Green Berets, Navy SEALS, and other Tier 1 special operation units.

Like many other combat veterans, Matt developed PTSD from some of these experiences and was not diagnosed until after his retirement in 2010. For the first few years it seemed like Matt was just surviving as he struggled to cope with the different emotions, fear and the anxiety he started to experience. Slowly after beginning to seek help from professionals, friends, family and mentors he began to learn little by little how to thrive more and survive less.

Since retiring Matt, and his wife Stacie has served in ministry as missionaries along with their son Nick for 2 years overseas. After returning Matt assumed a role of mobilizing, training, coaching and recruiting others into missions.  Still living in Savannah, Georgia Matt continues in this role, along with coaching others who are seeking to learn how to thrive more in various areas of their personal and professional lives. Matt also shares his story around the United States at retreats, conferences and churches.

 

Matt Rogie, a retired US Army special operations pilot, shares with veterans and other listeners his story of learning how to thrive, not just survive, as a combat veteran.

https://thrivingonmission.com/

 

PTSD Foundation of America https://ptsdusa.org/ 

 


Hour 2: Centre for Metrics - Director Shaun Flanagan

Shaun Flanagan spent 20 years working in the UK Government Statistical Service, gathering data and producing analysis for Government Ministers and officials to inform and monitor Government policy in a number of departments. In 2012 he left the Civil Service to be the Head of Statistics at The Association of British Insurers, where he ran a team producing a large volume of data outputs on the UK insurance industry. Between 2016 and 2018 Shaun was Senior Director for Evidence and Insight at Girl Effect (formerly part of the Nike Foundation), where he ran a large global team of analysts and researchers that gathered the data to inform, monitor and evaluate the organisations media programmes that empowered adolescent girls in developing countries to take control of their lives.

Legatum Institute https://li.com/  a London-based think tank and educational charity with a global vision to see all people lifted out of poverty.

 

Shaun Flanagan (Director of the Centre for Metrics) at the Legatum Institute discusses the United States Prosperity Index (USPI).  The USPI is the first comprehensive assessment of all aspects of prosperity across America and how this has changed over time.  It measures the extent to which all 50 states plus Washington, D.C. have open economies, inclusive societies, and empowered people, identifying their strengths and weaknesses and allowing comparison between the different states and regions.  In short, the Index tracks the availability of the American Dream to residents of every state.  Brien and Flanagan contend in their recent op-ed that the future of American prosperity ultimately depends on the critical function of states acting as “laboratories of democracy.”   

The USPI reveals that prosperity has increased across America over the last 10 years and the gap between the most and least prosperous states is narrowing.  But no state is performing well on all aspects of prosperity, so all states have opportunities to improve.  The USPI evaluates and ranks all 50 states plus Washington, DC using 200 indicators measuring 11 distinct pillars of prosperity: Business Environment, Market Access & Infrastructure, Economic Quality, Safety & Security, Personal Freedom, Governance, Social Capital, Living Conditions, Education, Health, and Natural Environment.  The Index with its state prosperity rankings, and in-depth state profiles, can be read online at:
 www.USProsperity.net.

“The Index reveals that there are clear opportunities for improvement in every state, and that states can and must learn from each other.  While the necessary area of focus is different for each state, citizens and policymakers across the U.S. should be looking to their peers for best practices from which they can learn.”

“The long-term prospects for the prosperity of the United States are strong.  The fundamental promise of the American social contract has stood the test of time: the success of the individual still feeds into the success of the nation as a whole, and vice versa.  The states have a critical role to play in the maintenance of that virtuous circle.”

The USPI further demonstrates that the national improvement in prosperity was driven by improvements in health, education, and living conditions across the country, as well as enhanced quality of the economy in most states.  But further growth in prosperity across the U.S. as a whole is being held back by a growing mental health crisis and declining social capital, evidenced by lower trust in the media and less interaction with neighbors.  The research makes clear that America’s historically strong institutions—which were designed so that the success of the individual would feed into the success of society and vice versa—have broken down in many areas.  The Legatum Institute, with its mission to create the pathways from poverty to prosperity, is now sharing the United States Prosperity Index with media nationwide and through Roadshow events across the United States.

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I’ve included Stephen Brien and Shaun Flanagan’s entire op-ed below:

https://townhall.com/columnists/stephenbrien/2020/01/20/american-prosperity-depends-on-states-being-laboratories-of-democracy-n2559801

 

American Prosperity Depends on States Being “Laboratories of Democracy

 

 

By Stephen Brien, D.Phil. and Shaun Flanagan

 

The United States represents what it is to be a prosperous nation, a modern “City upon a Hill.”  Its democratic structures serve as an example for others; its economy and productive capacity are world-leading; it has some of the world’s best universities; and its medical care facilities are among the most sophisticated in the world.

However, it is widely recognized that Americans’ well-being has not kept pace with their wealth, and that wealth is not evenly distributed across the country.  The Legatum Institute’s U.S. Prosperity Index, for the first time, identifies the variation in both economic and social well-being of each of the 50 states plus Washington D.C. and highlights the differences between regions and states.  It shows, for instance, that while the overall U.S. homicide rate is 5.3 per 100,000 people, this rate varies massively between 1.0 in New Hampshire and 12.4 in Louisiana, and that Maryland’s poverty rate of 9% is half that of New Mexico’s nearly 20%.

Justice Louis Brandeis famously described the states as ‘laboratories of democracy’, in which social and economic policies could be developed and tested without directly affecting the rest of the country.  The Index demonstrates the outcomes of those experiments, with more than 200 indicators measuring 11 distinct pillars of prosperity.  It tracks, in short, the availability of the American Dream to residents of every state.

While the Index’s finding that the level of prosperity enjoyed by states in the Northeast is much higher than in the South is not a shock, it is perhaps more surprising to see that no single state has yet succeeded in fostering a high degree of both economic and social well-being for its population.  Contrary to the global context, where the most prosperous countries perform well across all pillars of prosperity, no state in the U.S. is universally strong.  In fact, every state except top-ranked Massachusetts, is ranked below 20
th in at least one pillar.

The Index reveals that there are clear opportunities for improvement in every state, and that states can and must learn from each other.  While the necessary area of focus is different for each state, citizens and policymakers across the U.S. should be looking to their peers for best practices from which they can learn.  For instance, Connecticut, which is ranked 2
nd for prosperity overall but 29th for economic quality, might look to California as an example of a state that has improved its economic quality significantly over the last decade.  Similarly, although Nebraska is ranked just 16th for prosperity overall, it could provide an example of how to improve in the area of health to Maryland, which is ranked 9th overall but just 21st for health.

Many states have already demonstrated that improvements are possible.  For example, the District of Columbia saw the greatest increase in prosperity over the last 10 years, having upgraded its infrastructure through road and bridge improvements and seen safety and security improve with reductions in burglary and motor vehicle thefts.  Residents in the capital are also healthier than a decade ago, with falling rates of obesity and smoking, and a decreasing prevalence of high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart attacks.  However, there are still other areas to be addressed to drive even greater prosperity growth.  Washington, D.C.’s rates of alcohol use and illicit drug disorders are the highest in the U.S., and although it has the best higher education ranking and most educated residents in the country, its secondary education system is the poorest of all states.

Although priority areas and strategic approaches will necessarily vary, it is clear that state-level political will has much to contribute to the development of prosperity across the U.S.  But for too long, the majority of policymakers have focused on the big fiscal and macroeconomic policy tools at their disposal, or separately considered the social factors.  For future improvements in prosperity, it is vital that they take a holistic view, consider the broader implications of social, economic, and institutional policies, and seek opportunities to learn from each other.

The long-term prospects for the prosperity of the United States are strong.  The fundamental promise of the American social contract has stood the test of time: the success of the individual still feeds into the success of the nation as a whole, and vice versa.  The states have a critical role to play in the maintenance of that virtuous circle.

 

Stephen Brien, D.Phil. and Shaun Flanagan are the Director of Policy and Director of the Centre for Metrics respectively at the Legatum Institute, a London-based think tank and educational charity with a global vision to see all people lifted out of poverty.